Growing vegetables free of pesticides, herbicides, chemical fertilizers, and GMOs in Skull Valley, Arizona.


FIND US AT LOCAL FARMERS MARKETS:

Winter Prescott Farmers Market -- Walgreen's parking lot at the corner of Gail Gardener & Willow Creek Road -- Saturdays 10 AM - 2 PM -- November -April. Our farm will be here again starting in February 2015.


Summer Prescott Farmers Market -- Yavapai College parking lot -- Saturdays 7:30 AM - 12 Noon -- May 10th - October 25th

www.prescottfarmersmarket.org

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Flagstaff Community Market -- city hall parking lot, unde the solar panels --Sundays 8:00 AM - 12 Noon -- May 25th - October 12th

www.flagstaffmarket.com

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Want to stop by and pick up veggies from the farm? Please give us a call before you come!

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Contact Us: Reach us by email at rabbitrunfarmAZ@gmail.com or by phone at (928) 235-2044 or find us on Facebook

Friday, October 31, 2014

In the heart of autumn

Shorter days and cooler nights bring a welcome relief to farm life, a resting time that makes completion of small tasks very satisfying.  It is time for introspection, reflection, and creativity.  There is still work to be done: cleaning up summer fields, building compost piles, organizing irrigation pieces, sanding and repairing tools.

Matt takes down the heirloom tomato trellis in the high tunnel:

Beautiful poblano pepper crop this year! It's still going since we haven't yet had a hard frost:

 Matt harvesting beets for last weekend's market:

 It's spider season!  We welcome all kinds here, including this argiope spider:

Monday, September 22, 2014

Late Summer Rains

A lot has been happening around the farm these days.  With the end of the main market season in sight, we are taking note of successes and failures from this year. Our main summer tomato crop suffered from a number of ills, and we are keeping fingers crossed that the two late fall batches that Matt planted make it to maturity in time.  The onions and garlic did fabulous this spring, and we still are catching up on cleaning them for market.

August gave us 8" of rain, and September gave us a few too. This deluge has completely changed the nature of the farm - weeds have grown as well as native grasses, hornworms are loping around all over our solanacae plants, and the soil is holding so much moisture that our watering has become much less frequent.   The Armenian cucumbers also went through a revival:

The sweet potatoes have flooded the aisles, happily soaking up the rain, humidity, and temperatures in the high 80s.  We will begin harvesting them mid October, before the greens freeze hard. Matt up to his knees in sweet potatoes:

The heirloom tomatoes from our high tunnel are still pumping out beautiful fruit.  We will pull plants soon to prepare the beds for a winter crop of greens.

On another note, I had to share this photo of irrigated agriculture I took while flying over Colorado last month. What an incredible impact humans have on the landscape!

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

This week's veggie pick up

Large:

Carrots
Tomatoes
Mixed cherry tomatoes & yellow romas
Sweet yellow onions
Suyo long Japanese cucumbers (2)
Persian cucumbers
Curly kale
Red potatoes
Italian flat leaf parsley
Basil
Garlic

Small:

Tomatoes
Persian cucumbers
Suyo Long Japanese cucumber
Sweet yellow onions
Garlic
Italian flat leaf parsley


We'll be taking at least two weeks off from doing the veggie pick up.  Lots of fall planting to do!

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

This week's veggie pick up + onion harvesting

Greetings!  This week has brought cloudy skies, some rain, and a wonderful respite from the heat.  Most of the veggies are having a good time in this weather.  Many of the spring greens are petering out, but we will be planting another batch of them soon.  We are busy cleaning up the fields from the spring planting, in preparation to put in some cover crops and the fall/winter crops. 

This week's veggies, small:
Carrots
German Johnson heirloom tomato
Gold beets
Sweet yellow onions
Garlic
Armenian Cucumber


Large (no photo this week :( )
Carrots - double amount
German Johnson heirloom tomato
Gold beets
Sweet yellow onions
Garlic
Armenian Cucumber + sugar crunch Persian cucumber
Yukon Gold potatoes
Curly Kale
Sungold cherry tomatoes
Salad turnips
French Sorrel

We've also been harvesting our onions.  This year we put in considerably more, as in three times more plants, than any previous year.  Our onions have sold out usually by late September in past years, but this year we intend to do the winter market, so we hope this harvest will be enough!  Now we're realizing that we are tight on space to cure all the onions!  We have been pulling them in batches as their tops fall in the field, so we will have enough space to rotate them all in.
This photo is maybe a 5th of the onion crop so far.  The tables on the right are also double stacked!



 

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

This week's veggie pick up

You may have missed the last two weeks worth of pictures of the shares, my apologies.  I am back on track now, and have fresh photos of this week's harvest!  We are moving into the summer crops, slowly but surely. Tomatoes are ripening one by one, hinting at the coming onslaught.  Matt dug a few potatoes for the large share, part of his experimental plot.  We still are harvesting tasty summer lettuce, though after this week we'll have none for a bit.  Basil is loving the new humidity, and has been enjoying it's spot in the high tunnel, under diffused light. 

Large:
Red Summer Crisp lettuce
Yellow & Red spring onions
Carrots - some orange, some purple!
Curly kale
Red potatoes
German Johnson heirloom tomatoes (red ones)
Sungold cherry tomatoes
Kohlrabi
Basil
Forono beets
Garlic
Radishes


Small:
Red Summer Crisp lettuce
Yellow & Red spring onions
Carrots - some orange, some purple!
Radishes
Basil
Garlic

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

This week's veggie pick up

We have been busy planting our summer crops, including watermelons, cantaloupes, okra, cucumbers, and successions of root crops. One of the challenging aspects of small scale farming is getting our successions in on time, so that we have a continual harvest all year long. From our first year farming, we have improved in this area dramatically! Every year, however, we keep up well on certain crops, and let others slide. This year we've kept up on our brassica crops (broccoli & cabbage), as well as radishes, turnips, and spinach. Our eggplant is waiting patently to be planted, late for us this year, as well as a new batch of lettuce and some healthy looking pepper plants. 

Large:
Red Cabbage
Rainbow Carrots
Orange Carrots
Broccoli
Parsley
Garlic - early California white
Sugar snap peas - eat the whole pod raw or cooked.
Curly Kale
Kohlrabi - a sweet crunchy bulb, similar in taste to jicama. Peel and use shredded in salads or finely chopped for dipping.
Bok Choy
Italian Basil
brown tepary beans (not pictured)


Small:
Broccoli
Orange Carrots
Sugar snap peas - eat the whole pod raw or cooked.
Curly Kale
Garlic - early California white
brown tepary beans (not pictured)

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

This week's veggie pick up

Skull Valley produce pick-up shares for this week!  Large and small:

If you're interested in a share for next week, please contact me!  Skull Valley pick up, Tuesdays 4-6pm.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

This week's veggie pick up

This season we're trying something new!  A local Skull Valley veggie pick up! 

A huge thank you to Brig, our enthusiastic neighbor, for helping organize the first week pick up.

If you are interested in getting a box of freshly harvested, locally grown, and chemical/pesticide free produce, please contact me.  Pickup time is Tuesdays 4-6pm in Skull Valley.  This week, since we're still small, pick up is at the farm on Cottonwood Lane, under the huge cottonwood by the gate.  Large size: $30.00; small: $15.00.

What's in the box:

Large:
Broccolini - sprouting broccoli, eat the stems and all!
Lacinato Kale
Radishes
Gold Beets - the greens are great to cook on the beets as well!
Forono Beets, Italian heirloom
Green Butter Lettuce
Cherokee Red Lettuce
Spinach
Broccoli
Bok Choy
Italian flat leaf parsley
Sage


Small:
Curly Kale
Spinach
Chioggia beets - Italian heirloom, candy striped insides
Italian flat-leaf parsley
Broccoli
Green Butter Lettuce

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Spring around the farm

This year we planted our regular soft neck garlic, and some hard necks too.  The fourth bed from the right is the hard neck varieties with darker green, less blue leaves.  All of the garlic is doing fabulous.



Because Matt has been doing a lot of this:

Sarah weeding carrots while Henry listens to the evening coyote calls:

Lettuce in cells before planting this week:

Before we were able to cover the newly planted kohlrabi, lettuce, and cabbage, we got some sleet this morning!  Hopefully this will be the last cold snap for spring:

Goodnight to the high tunnel tomatoes under cover:

All for now!

Sunday, March 30, 2014

We have been busy on the farm!  So busy I forget to sit down and share it here. This warm spring has been on-going, and we are planting accordingly.  The barberry is blooming, the cottonwoods started their snowy seed shower last week.  We have even heard frogs at night around the 1st of March!  There may come a night when we are rushing to the farm with frost blankets in hand, but we will hope it holds off.

The onions are in the ground!  We are trying something new with them this year: planting on plastic mulch.  Onions are notoriously hard to keep weeded - even in their maturity they provide no canopy to shade out new weeds. We had lots of help getting these 13,000 onions in the ground (thanks everyone!) - it's the usually the first and most tedious transplanting of the season.  It's been two weeks since this picture was taken, and the onions are now standing at attention and are growing happily.


In fact, the mulch-layer is our newest labor saving device on the farm, so it will be making an appearance all season.  Farming in a very rural location + being a small business with limited cash flow + living off the farm = a challenge for us to find much needed reliable, able labor on the farm.  We are hoping the mulch layer will provide a relief from labor spent weeding, so when we do have extra help, it can be dedicated to planting, harvesting, and other projects.

Kale in the greenhouse that was planted in the field last week:

Lettuce that we planted out this morning:

Parsley surrounded by cottonwood seeds.  We have already seen some of these seeds sprout in the wet spots of our beds!

With seven weeks until the first market, we will be planting non-stop!  

Sunday, January 26, 2014

A new look & what we do in the winter

Well you may have noticed the new face of this blog!  I have had many people tell me I should post more... and that will be on of my new year's resolutions (at least for the farm). 

So yesterday, while poking around on the blogger website, I completely messed up our old format, and only noticed the "backup" option after I wrecked it.  So I spent some hours fixing things, and this is where it stands now!  There may be more changes afoot as I keep learning about the new format options. 
Suggestions welcome too!

What do we do in the winter?  After the markets end, we spend time cleaning up the fields, pulling up drip tape, and cleaning and putting all of the tools to rest.  Tools all sanded, oiled, and soaking up the last warm fall sun:

Lots of time goes to planning, seed and supply ordering, reviewing the past year, and figuring out how to make things better and easier this next year. Seed catalogs seem to be coming out of the woodwork, there are more every year!

I also work off-farm at an accountant's office, full time Dec-April.  This makes for a crunch-time in April, but it reliably pays the bills in the off season, and also gives me more experience in office managing and lets me learn more about taxes, accounting, and the business side of things.

Matt has been busy prepping fields, fixing broken things, and getting ready for the busy season.  He's been making soil mix, filling trays, and itching to start seeding them.  The whole blue barrel is full of soil mix that he's made.  The black trays will hold the first brassica seedlings. 



Since it's been unseasonably warm in Arizona for January, we've both been getting antsy about starting seeds.  We have to refer to our crop book to remind us that January may be a bit early for starting some seeds.  I write down all our seed starting dates and amounts which helps us review what worked and what didn't each year. 

While most crops will grow and do just fine to start this early, we won't be selling crops on a large scale until the farmers markets start in May, and our weekends up until the market will most likely be spent feverishly planting, rather than at the new winter market.  Hopefully next year this will be different, and we'll be able to attend the winter market before the May markets!  Stay tuned for updates as spring arrives, as we may have produce available in April for sale!

Lastly, winter is a time for rest and maybe some travel.  When we started farming, the "off-season" sounded like a great time for vacation!  We realize now that this is harder to do than it sounds, because on a farm even when the crops are slowing down, there is still work to be done!  However, as we get our farm systems in place, and have trustworthy friends to watch over things, each year gets a little easier for us to take off more time in the winter and leave town. 

I went to Austin, TX to visit my girlfriends from college, and got to check out the town's veggie scene as well.  There is a lot of vegetable love in Austin:


Check back for more as spring arrives!